Indiscriminate use of pesticides and lack of sanitary control in the domestic market in Peru

Jaime Delgado-Zegarra, Aldo Alvarez-Risco, Jaime A. Yáñez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Contribution to Journal)

Abstract

This communication seeks to report the level of contamination of foodstuffs of animal and vegetable origin monitored by a health authority of Peru, namely the National Agrarian Health Service (SENASA), in order to inform consumers and national authorities of the current situation of sanitary control of the Peruvian domestic market. Information was obtained from reports posted on the SENASA website. The data considered correspond to those present in evaluation reports of all food types of vegetable and animal origin analyzed in the period 2011–2015. Results for this period show that 202 samples of animal and plant origin were in violation of standards (noncompliant). Overall, 12.68% of food samples of animal origin and 24.87% of food samples of vegetable origin were noncompliant. Over the course of the studied period, a 30.73% increase in the proportion of noncompliant samples was observed, reaching as high as 50%. The levels of contamination of foods of animal and vegetable origin monitored by SENASA are concerning. It is thus recommended that concrete actions be implemented to address this situation, and that these actions be prioritized and planned with the involvement of all actors in Peru’s agricultural system in order to introduce the necessary regulatory changes and establish clear, measurable, and achievable indicators of monitoring and control to protect the health of the population.

Translated title of the contributionIndiscriminate use of pesticides and lack of sanitary control in the domestic market in Peru
Original languageSpanish
Article numbere3
JournalRevista Panamericana de Salud Publica/Pan American Journal of Public Health
Volume42
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jan 2018
Externally publishedYes

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