It Matters What Young People Watch: Health Risk Behaviors Portrayed in Top-Grossing Movies Since 1950

Patrick E. Jamieson, Eian More, Susan S. Lee, Peter Busse, Daniel Romer

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

© Oxford University Press, 2014. All Rights Reserved. Films have long been a major influence on youth, and their content changed dramatically with the demise of the production code in the 1960s. To understand changes in film content, the Coding of Health and Media Project (CHAMP) analyzed the top-30 grossing movies from 1950 to 2004. This chapter presents trends in gender and youth representation, as well as in portrayal of tobacco and alcohol use, and sex and violence. Bandura's social cognitive theory of mass communication is used to explain how such content may influence audiences. Over the study period, youth and male characters were increasingly represented. Consistent with a cultural shift in attitudes toward tobacco and alcohol, portrayal in both decreased. However, violence (especially as committed by youth) and sex increased. Although the MPAA rating system (G, PG, PG13, R) was intended to inform movie audiences of problematic content, the system restricted sexual content far better than violent content.
Original languageAmerican English
Title of host publicationThe Changing Portrayal of Adolescents in the Media Since 1950
ISBN (Electronic)9780199894284, 9780195342956
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Apr 2010
Externally publishedYes

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    Jamieson, P. E., More, E., Lee, S. S., Busse, P., & Romer, D. (2010). It Matters What Young People Watch: Health Risk Behaviors Portrayed in Top-Grossing Movies Since 1950. In The Changing Portrayal of Adolescents in the Media Since 1950 https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195342956.003.0005